He Bought A House

Here lies Walter Fielding. He bought a house, and it killed him.

—-The Money Pit

House Being Remodeled, The Cedars, Dallas, Texas

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An Original System of Numbering

“He told me that in 1886 he had invented an original system of numbering and that in a very few days he had gone beyond the twenty-four-thousand mark. He had not written it down, since anything he thought of once would never be lost to him. His first stimulus was, I think, his discomfort at the fact that the famous thirty-three gauchos of Uruguayan history should require two signs and two words, in place of a single word and a single sign. He then applied this absurd principle to the other numbers. In place of seven thousand thirteen he would say (for example) Maximo Pérez; in place of seven thousand fourteen, The Railroad; other numbers were Luis Melián LafinurOlimarsulphurthe reinsthe whalethe gasthe caldronNapoleonAgustin de Vedia. In place of five hundred, he would say nine. Each word had a particular sign, a kind of mark; the last in the series were very complicated…”
― Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths: Selected Stories and Other Writings

The Cedars, Dallas, Texas

 

Made of Earth and Rain

“At night I dream that you and I are two plants
that grew together, roots entwined,
and that you know the earth and the rain like my mouth,
since we are made of earth and rain.”
― Pablo Neruda, Regalo de un Poeta

Petrified Wood Gas Station,
Decatur, Texas

All Things Considered, It’s Coming Along Okay

“How is the birdhouse coming along, Charlie Brown?”
“Well, I’m a lousy carpenter, I can’t nail straight, I can’t saw straight and I always split the wood… I’m nervous, I lack confidence, I’m stupid, I have poor taste and absolutely no sense of design… So, all things considered, it’s coming along okay!”
—- Charles M. Schulz, The Complete Peanuts

Wry Birdhouse Main Street Deep Ellum Dallas, Texas

Wry Birdhouse
Main Street
Deep Ellum
Dallas, Texas

He Will Kill Himself With Climbing

“And what, O Queen, are those things that are dear to a man? Are they not bubbles? Is not ambition but an endless ladder by which no height is ever climbed till the last unreachable rung is mounted? For height leads on to height, and there is not resting-place among them, and rung doth grow upon rung, and there is no limit to the number.”
― H. Rider Haggard, She

Ladder for Booker T. Washington Martin Puryear Modern Art Musuem of Fort Woth

Ladder for Booker T. Washington
Martin Puryear
Modern Art Musuem of Fort Woth

“Tell him to seek the stars and he will kill himself with climbing.”
― Charles Bukowski, The Roominghouse Madrigals: Early Selected Poems, 1946-1966

Ladder for Booker T. Washington Martin Puryear Modern Art Musuem of Fort Woth

Ladder for Booker T. Washington
Martin Puryear
Modern Art Musuem of Fort Woth

When the Pretty Women Walk Over My Grave

“It’s not what I’d want for at my funeral. When I die, I just want them to plant me somewhere warm. And then when the pretty women walk over my grave I would grab their ankles, like in that movie.”
― Neil Gaiman, American Gods

Funerary Figure (tau-tau) Dallas Museum of Art Dallas, Texas

Funerary Figure (tau-tau)
Dallas Museum of Art
Dallas, Texas

Dallas Museum of Art
Dallas, Texas

(label text)
Funerary figure (tau-tau)
Indonesia: South Sluawesi, Sa’dan Toraja People
19th century or earlier
Wood
The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc. 1980.2 McD

The Toraja carve tau-tau, smaller than life-size funerary figures, to commemorate the deceased when a high-ranking funeral is held. Only members of the highest-ranking aristocracy are permitted to have permanent tau-tau. This unusually small funerary figure appears to be archaic in style and probably predates even the oldest effigies seen beside Toraja tombs today.

The bun or hair knot at the back of the head of this tau-tau indicates that it represents a female. Her mouth is open and may remind one of The Scream, a modern painting by Edvard Munch. The expression is not precisely understood, but it may have been meant to capture bearing of an authoritative aristocratic woman accustomed during her lifetime to public speaking and giving orders, as this tau-tau appears to be doing

Timber

There are a handful of modern sculptures scattered across the various quads on the Tulane campus in New Orleans. One I noticed the first time, more than four years ago, that we took Lee there for a visit was a construction of wood and a stack of handmade multi-colored glass blocks that stands in front of the Architecture building.

I always like to take a look at it when I visit.

Timber
Glass, Steel, and Wood, 1982
by
Gene Koss, American

Timber, by Gene Koss, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana (click to enlarge)

Timber, by Gene Koss, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana
(click to enlarge)

Timber, by Gene Koss, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana (click to enlarge)

Timber, by Gene Koss, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana
(click to enlarge)

Timber, by Gene Koss, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana (click to enlarge)

Timber, by Gene Koss, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana
(click to enlarge)