Another Man’s Weeds

One man’s wildflowers are another man’s weeds.

—-Antonio Vitalis, From Hell’s Heart I Stab At Thee

Wildflowers, Huffhines Park, Richardson, Texas

The City allows patches, often in vegetated medians or along the borders of parks, to grow unattended, unmowed, into patches of wildflowers. I stopped along one such patch on my bike ride and took a few photos. Mostly the ubiquitous Texas Bluebonnets, but also other, similar, wildflowers of various colors. On this patch there was a singular clump of these which stood out and above the others. I have no idea what these are (Black Eye’d Susans?) but they drew the eye. And the camera.

2 responses to “Another Man’s Weeds

  1. They’re called Mexican hat, because of their resemblance to a sombrero. The scientific name is Ratibida columnifera. You can read about them here. They’re pretty widespread across the state, and one of my favorite summer flowers. You should see them into the fall.

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