Short Story of the day, Caltrops by Tim Pratt

“And to these beautiful two children
And to my sweet and tender wife
I will love you three forever
Through I fly beyond this life”
― Lyle Lovett, The Twelfth of June

Design District Dallas, Texas

Tonight we spent ten dollars and bought an online concert with Lyle Lovett and Chris Isaak – each singing alone and separate. The sang with acoustic guitars unaccompanied. It was genius – the best ten bucks we ever spent.

Chris Isaak singing Wicked Games solo was amazing – a wildly different take on a very familiar song. So was Baby Did A Bad Bad Thing.

Lyle Lovett, of course, was incredible. On My Boat is one of my favorites of all time. He sang a beautiful, sad, new song called Twelfth of June that was absolutely gorgeous, breathtaking, and heartbreaking. I hope he records it soon.

The pandemic forced these two great musicians into this weird pay-per-view format, but it was stunning and so much fun.

Plus, here’s a quick, fun flash fiction.

Caltrops by Tim Pratt

 

Encore

We drove to Fort Worth to see Chris Isaak this evening at Billy Bob’s Texas. We went early so we could walk around and get something to eat. I have forgotten how much fun the Fort Worth Stockyards are – not to mention the world’s biggest honkey tonk.

Near the end of Chris Isaak’s set I saw something I had never seen before. Back in the day, we all used to hold up lighters at the end of a show – there would be this sea of flame spread out across the concert hall to signify our desire to see and hear a few more songs. At a particularly gnarly show folks would gather trash from the floor of the venue, light it, and hold it aloft – I guess to sort of kick things up a notch.

Nowadays this has morphed into everyone holding up the illuminated screen of their phones – a sea of iPhones glowing in the darkness. I’m afraid I’ve always thought this was pretty lame.

Tonight I some something new. Somebody was holding up a tablet – I don’t think it was an iPad – it looked a little smaller – maybe an Android tablet of some kind. At any rate they held it high, waiting for the encore.

And on the screen was an app that displayed a flickering flame.