What I learned this week, December 31, 2021

Get the Hell Out of Here 2021 and Oh, Shit, Here Comes 2022

For Our Own Good, We All Need a Glimpse of the Evil Queen

Now, as far as I am concerned, dreams are statements from nature. It is not so much that we create them. They manifest themselves to us.


Drinks menu… the coffee looks good, but “Treats from the Teat” – I don’t know if that’s as catchy as they think it is.

Best News of 2021: Coffee Is Incredibly Good for You

Maybe your New Year’s resolution should be an easy one: drink more coffee.


Good food makes for happy customers.

How to be happy: the psychology behind the “HEAL” method and how it helps you become happier

Fascinating new research suggests that it’s psychologically possible to train yourself to be happier.


Two girls enjoying the art for sale at the “For the Love of Kettle” event.

The unconventional approach to New Year’s resolutions that makes them stick

With this approach, perhaps you can sidestep the inevitable challenges that come with traditional New Year’s resolutions and achieve lasting, positive changes.


Fabrication Yard, Dallas, Texas

The Ungracious–and Their Demonization of the Past

The last two years have seen an unprecedented escalation in a decades-long war on the American past. But there are lots of logical flaws in attacking prior generations in U.S. history.


Venus Victrix (The Judgement of Paris), Pierre Auguste Renoir & Hercules the Archer, Antoine Bourdelle, Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden

The Evolutionary Advantages of Playing Victim

Victimhood is defined in negative terms: “the condition of having been hurt, damaged, or made to suffer.” Yet humans have evolved to empathize with the suffering of others, and to provide assistance so as to eliminate or compensate for that suffering. Consequently, signaling suffering to others can be an effective strategy for attaining resources. Victims may receive attention, sympathy, and social status, as well as financial support and other benefits


hiva Nataraja, South India, Tamil Nadu, Chola dynasty, 11th century, bronze, Dallas Museum of Art

How disruptions happen

Major disruptions in world history follow a clear pattern. What can upheavals of the past tell us about our own future?

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