What I learned this week, October 15, 2021

Artwork in the Braindead Brewing Company, Deep Ellum, Dallas, Texas

The great reimagination of work’: Why 50% of workers want to make a career change

The coronavirus pandemic has forced Americans to reassess their relationships with work. 

The Labor Department’s most recent Job Openings and Labor Turnover Summary suggests that roughly 4 million Americans are quitting their jobs each month in a trend that has become known as “The Great Resignation.” 

I am shocked at how many people are leaving my place of work. The most common reason is the vaccination mandate – but a lot of people are just burned out. It won’t be long – but I will join them soon. It’s pretty much all I think about.


Standing Man With Radiating Words, Leslie Dill, Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden

25 Words That Don’t Mean What They Used To

It’s to be expected that the words we use will change and develop over time as they begin to be used in original and innovative new contexts. But in some instances, these developments can lead to words gaining new meanings entirely different from their original implications—and the 25 words listed here have done just that.


Something In front of Braindead Brewing Deep Ellum Dallas, Texas

How to declutter your mind

If your brain is a heaving mess of work and life to-dos, find some focus with these straightforward steps from Ryder Carroll, creator of the Bullet Journal.


Damian Priour, Austin Temple (detail) 2000 fossil limestone, glass, steel In Memory of Buddy Langston 1947-2004 Frisco, Texas

12 Old Words That Survived by Getting Fossilized in Idioms

English has changed a lot in the last several hundred years, and there are many words once used that we would no longer recognize today. For whatever reason, we started pronouncing them differently, or stopped using them entirely, and they became obsolete. There are some old words, however, that are nearly obsolete, but we still recognize them because they were lucky enough to get stuck in set phrases that have lasted across the centuries. Here are 12 words that survived by getting fossilized in idioms.


Fountainhead Charles Long Northpark Center Dallas, Texas

Are we really mindless victims of consumerism?

To prove the advertising industry’s omnipotence, critics have been repeating some myths for more than half a century.


A Stoic’s Key to Peace of Mind: Seneca on the Antidote to Anxiety

A twenty-four-hour news cycle that preys on this human propensity has undeniably aggravated the problem and swelled the 8% to appear as 98%, but at the heart of this warping of reality is an ancient tendency of mind so hard-wired into our psyche that it exists independently of external events.


New Orleans Gargoyle, Thomas Randolph Morrison, New Orleans, Louisiana

How to (Finally) Put an End to Pointless Arguments

Count me as a Buster Benson fan. His 2016 Cognitive bias cheat sheet is legendary among behavioral designers. I have a framed print out of his codex in my home and I’ve enjoyed his writing on various topics for years. He has extensive experience building products that move people at Slack, Twitter, and Habit Labs.

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