X , Nasher XChange, Entry Two of Ten

Previously in the Nasher XChange series:
Flock in Space, Nasher XChange, Entry One of Ten

Out of the wide variety of the Nasher XChange art exhibition the sculpture/work that is closest to where I live is X, a sculpture done by Liz Larner on the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) campus. It’s ten easy bicycle miles, with a trail the whole way. On cold and wet Sunday morning, I bundled up and rode up there – forgetting my map, so I had to wander the campus a bit until I found the sculpture.

There are actually two versions. A preliminary wooden version sits inside a lobby of the new arts and science building while a polished metal version sits in a deep, narrow grass-covered atrium outside. It’s a surprisingly isolated location – I can’t imagine too many people visiting it there, unless you count the students walking by overhead along some exterior corridors.

In some ways I like the wooden, temporary version better. It seems warmer and more organic – a nice contrast to the abstract mathematical variable qualities of the X.

Liz Larner X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas

Liz Larner
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas

Liz Larner X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas (click to enlarge)

Liz Larner
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas
(click to enlarge)

From the Nasher Website:

Liz Larner
Los Angeles, California
X
800 W. Campbell Rd.
University of Texas at Dallas
Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building

Two sculptures elegantly symbolize the intersection of art and technology.

Liz Larner is a Los Angeles-based artist whose work has been characterized by a sustained examination into the nature of sculpture. For Nasher XChange, Larner has created two sculptures for the new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building as a symbol for the exchange of ideas between these disciplines. Arts and Technology is a new interdisciplinary curriculum at UT Dallas that fosters collaboration at the intersection of the arts and humanities with science and engineering, and is a partnership between the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and the School of Arts and Humanities.

The innovative X-shape of the sculptures, described by the artist as continuing her “investigation into the open form and the use of line to create volume,” has been developed over several years and could not have been realized without the use of digital modeling technology.

Larner’s experience working both with and without technology intrigued faculty at UT Dallas, and made this pairing a natural fit as the program progresses through its first year. A wood version of the sculpture, on view inside the building, embodies the intersection of traditional sculpture media and new technology. The stainless steel version, being made for the outdoor courtyard, evokes the futuristic and technological, providing a fleeting succession of colors and flashes of light and shadow reflecting the activities and experiences of the building’s occupants and visitors.

Liz Larner X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas (click to enlarge)

Liz Larner
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas
(click to enlarge)

Liz Larner X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas (click to enlarge)

Liz Larner
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas
(click to enlarge)

Liz Larner X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas

Liz Larner
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas

From the Label Text:
Liz Larner
X, 2013
Stainless steel
Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles

Los Angeles-based artist Liz Larner engages some of the most intrinsic issues of sculpture, such as the relation of line and mass, or of volume and density, yet she does so in unexpected ways, in a range of materials and techniques. For Nasher XChange, Larner has created two sculptures for the new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building that can be seen as figures enacting the exchange of ideas between these disciplines. The X-shape of the sculptures, described by the artist as continuing “my investigation into the open form and the use of line to create volume,” has developed over several years and could not have been realized without Larner’s use of digital modeling technology. A wood version of the sculpture, on view inside the building, embodies the intersection of traditional sculpture media and new technology. A stainless steel version, seen here, evokes the futuristic and technological, providing a fleeting succession of colors and flashes of light and shadow reflecting the activities and experiences of the building’s occupants and visitors.

Liz Larner X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas Indoor, Wooden Version (click to enlarge)

Liz Larner
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas
Indoor, Wooden Version
(click to enlarge)

My Raleigh Technium road bike reflected in the window outside X,  UTD, Richardson, Texas

My Raleigh Technium road bike reflected in the window outside
X,
UTD, Richardson, Texas

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8 responses to “X , Nasher XChange, Entry Two of Ten

  1. Pingback: Fountainhead , Nasher XChange, Entry Three of Ten | Bill Chance

  2. Pingback: Moore to the Point, Nasher XChange, Entry Four of Ten | Bill Chance

  3. Pingback: Buried House, Nasher XChange, Entry Five of Ten | Bill Chance

  4. Pingback: dear sunset, Nasher XChange, Entry six of Ten | Bill Chance

  5. Pingback: Music (Everything I know I learned the day my son was born), Nasher XChange, Entry Seven of Ten | Bill Chance

  6. Pingback: Black & Blue: A Cultural Oasis in the Hills, Nasher XChange, Entry Eight of Ten | Bill Chance

  7. Pingback: Curtains, Nasher XChange, Entry Nine of Ten | Bill Chance

  8. Pingback: Trans.lation: Vickery Meadow, Nasher XChange, Entry Ten of Ten | Bill Chance

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