I Lost the Empty Feeling And Began To Be Happy

“As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.”
― Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Allgood Cafe Deep Ellum Dallas, Texas

Allgood Cafe
Deep Ellum
Dallas, Texas


Allgood Cafe

What I learned this week, January 30, 2015

Writing in my Moleskine Journal outside the Mojo Lounge, Decatur Street, French Quarter, New Orleans

Writing in my Moleskine Journal outside the Mojo Lounge, Decatur Street, French Quarter, New Orleans


The Value of Remembering Ordinary Moments


Shaun is having a bad day.

Shaun is having a bad day.


The 100 Best “B Movies” of All Time

The scary thing is that I’ve seen almost all of these. Really happy that The Magic Sword is on here at #50. The article says, “I imagine I would have loved this movie if I was a child growing up in the early 1960s.” Well, I did grow up then and I did love the film.

Totally agree with #1, by the way.


Detail from Eyes of the Cat, by Moebius and  Alejandro Jodorowsky

Detail from Eyes of the Cat, by Moebius and Alejandro Jodorowsky


10 Science Fiction Illustrators You Should Know

Detail from Eyes of the Cat, by Moebius and  Alejandro Jodorowsky

Detail from Eyes of the Cat, by Moebius and Alejandro Jodorowsky


Eyes of the Cat


ppl7


Ranking Dallas’ Best Neighborhoods for Restaurants

I know there will be a lot of disagreement, but I’d rate my inner-ring suburb, with its wealth of ethnic choices, up there with a lot of these. We’re only missing high-end dining, which I can’t afford (who can?) anyway.


Dancing Frogs and a 5 Dollar Chicken Fajita Bowl.

Dancing Frogs and a 5 Dollar Chicken Fajita Bowl.


The Return of the Dancing Frogs


A Guide to Lowest Greenville



Abandoned Futuro House Found in Royce City Texas


Commander's Palace

Commander’s Palace


The 25 Classic Restaurants Every New Orleanian Must Try

As best as I can remember, I think I’ve been to fourteen of these – some of them a long time ago. The next one I want to go to is Willie Mae’s Scotch House for the fried chicken and the Mac and Cheese.

Bikes locked up in front of Parkway, New Orleans, Louisiana

Bikes locked up in front of Parkway, New Orleans, Louisiana

The Return Of the Yumbo And Existential Malaise

The Yumbo

The Yumbo

In all its glory.

When I look back on the past, In some ways I feel like the same person I was when I was seven years old. In other ways, I feel like my memories are those of an alien that used to occupy my body.

For example, for the first few years after I graduated from school, I used to eat fast food all the time. I used to love Burger King. What was I thinking?

I guess in one sense I was living in a place and time without a lot of choices. I did attempt to cook at home as much as I could – but it’s not easy to vittleate for one and cheaper to simply eat out. I was traveling a lot – and always liked getting a quick break from work at lunch. That adds up to fast food. At that time there simply weren’t the healthy and local diversity of dining options that there is today. There was no smartphone internet to search for the closest Pho place or the best Big Salad on the West side.

Those times have thankfully passed and I haven’t eaten at a Burger King in over twenty years. I’m sure the last were traveling with the kids and lured into places with a big indoor Playland – my kids were connoisseurs of ballpits and plastic slides.

The other week I came across an internet article criticizing Burger King – calling it The Saddest Chain in Fast Food – documenting its precipitous slide into the lowest depths of inadequate mediocrity.

And human beings in general are calibrated in such a way that they can inherently pick up on the sort of existential malaise your typical BK is now spewing into the atmosphere.

Until I read this article I hadn’t even thought about Burger King for decades – the thousands I’ve driven past have been invisible smears of red and yellow in my peripheral vision.

Then I heard a radio ad the other day. After that I came across another version on television.

The Yumbo had returned.

A Yumbo is a bilious concoction that resembles a ham and cheese sandwich. These were popular items in the early 1970’s – I remember them and can’t believe that it was that long ago.

Actually, I never ate one back in the day (I was out of the country in the Yumbo’s heyday). What made an impression on me, something I remember vividly until today, was a magazine piece I read at the time. I’ve had to dig around the internets to find out what it was:

It was from May 1977, from the magazine The Atlantic. A short Essay by Andrew Ward called, “Yumbo.”

I have not been able to find a current copy – but that’s not important. I remember it well.

The story is a simple one. A distinguished, intellectual older man walks into a Burger King and orders a ham and cheese sandwich.
“Do you mean a Yumbo?” asks the woman behind the counter.
“A ham and cheese sandwich, please,” is his reply.
“You mean a Yumbo?” she repeats.

And they are at a standoff. She will not sell him a sandwich until he utters or confirms the word, “Yumbo.” He refuses to do so – out of some desire to retain the small amount of dignity the modern world might allow him to posses.

The man leaves the establishment hamandcheese-less as well as Yumbo-less… hungry. It is a sad tale of the coarseness of modern life and the helplessness of trying to defend against the onslaught of the uncivilized horde.

So now, after somewhere around forty years, the Yumbo is back. I had to give it a shot.

So as I was driving home through the desolate stretches of some north Texas upscale suburb I asked the little woman inside my phone for the nearest Burger King. She offered me a choice of destinations and I selected one that I had no idea actually existed until the little pin showed up on that map spread across that tiny screen.

I confidently walked in, breathed deep the thick miasma of existential malaise and ordered, “A ham and cheese meal, please.”

The manager simply said, “What size?”

He didn’t make me say “Yumbo.”

I was disappointed.

A Yumbo meal spewing existential malaise into the atmosphere

A Yumbo meal spewing existential malaise into the atmosphere

Dharmapala Vajrabhairava

“Letting go gives us freedom, and freedom is the only condition for happiness. If, in our heart, we still cling to anything – anger, anxiety, or possessions – we cannot be free.”
― Thích Nhất Hạnh, The Heart of the Buddha’s Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation

Buddhist God Dharmapala Vajrabhairava Tibet 18th century gild bronze Dallas Museum of Art

Buddhist God
Dharmapala Vajrabhairava
Tibet 18th century gild bronze
Dallas Museum of Art

I Wear the Chain I Forged In Life

“You are fettered,” said Scrooge, trembling. “Tell me why?”
“I wear the chain I forged in life,” replied the Ghost. “I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

Sculpture Jason Mehl The Cedars, Dallas, Texas

Sculpture
Jason Mehl
The Cedars, Dallas, Texas

Jason Mehl

The Inability Of the Human Mind To Correlate All Its Contents

“The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents… some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age.”
― H.P. Lovecraft, The Call Of Cthulhu

Buckingham Road, Richardson, Texas

Buckingham Road, Richardson, Texas